RMA Promoting Proper Tire Repair

Free Materials Provided to Tire and Auto Service Providers

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C., August 10, 2012 – The Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA) wants to help tire and automotive repair businesses educate consumers about proper tire repair.

For decades, RMA has published tire repair standards that are recognized by the industry and courts. The tire manufacturer group is asking automotive repair businesses to help promote proper tire care to their customers under the banner of “Repaired Right Here™.”

“We’re providing tire dealers, auto dealers, auto repair facilities and others with free tools to allow those businesses to address punctured tires with industry-approved tire repair standards,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “For those who train their people to repair tires properly and follow RMA’s repair procedures, we invite them to promote themselves and their business by telling their customers that tires are ‘Repaired Right Here™.’

The materials include RMA’s puncture repair wall chart with detailed procedures to teach and remind repair technicians to properly inspect, assess and, if conditions warrant, repair tires according to longstanding industry standards.

Also included are a one-page summary of RMA’s puncture repair procedures suitable for explaining to customers who ask about tire repair policies and a Repaired Right Here™ decal to display in a retail location once RMA’s tire repair procedures are implemented.

The materials were part of a large-scale RMA mailing to more than 220,000 automotive service providers, tire dealers, auto dealers and others. The mailing included four important tire repair and service wall charts plus a comprehensive CD with many additional tire service publications. The materials are important reference materials for any business that sells or services tires.

“Consumers should understand that there’s a right way and a wrong way to repair tires,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “Improper tire repairs are a safety risk and should be avoided. We hope that these materials will not only serve as important reminders and training tools for tire and auto repair technicians but also will be used to help educate consumers about proper tire repair.”

Among the criteria to perform a proper repair are:

    • Repairs are limited to the tread area only;

 

    • Puncture injury cannot be greater than ¼-inch (6mm) in diameter;

 

    • Repairs must be performed by removing the tire from the rim/wheel assembly to perform a complete inspection to assess all damage that may be present ;

 

    • Repairs cannot overlap;

 

  • A rubber stem, or plug, must be applied to fill the puncture injury and a patch must be applied to seal the inner liner. A common repair unit is a one-piece unit with a stem and patch portion. A plug by itself or a patch by itself is an unacceptable repair.

The complete guidelines for proper tire repair can be accessed on RMA’s Puncture Repair Procedures for Passenger and Light Truck Tires wall chart. The chart is available for purchase at www.rma.org. A free, downloadable, PowerPoint version of the wall chart also is available from RMA’s web site.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S.

NEW YORK SENATE ADVANCES TIRE REPAIR LEGISLATION

Action Occurs During National Tire Safety Week

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

ALBANY, NYJune 8, 2012 - A New York Senate committee approved legislation to require automotive repair shops to properly repair tires.

S 7082, the Proper Tire Repair Act, would impose a $500 penalty on a repair shop that attempts to repair tires without removing the tire from the rim, inspecting for damage and ensuring that a repair conforms to repair procedures supported by tire makers. The bill was passed by the Senate Transportation Committee on June 5 during National Tire Safety Week, a tire industry initiative that promotes safety with a focus on educating consumers about how to properly maintain and care for their tires.

“This legislation will help protect motorists from the risks of improperly repaired tires,” said Dan Zielinski, senior vice president for the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA), an industry trade group that represents tire manufacturers. “Despite years of effort by tire manufacturers, tire dealer organizations and tire repair materials manufacturers to educate repair shops about proper repair, too many improper repairs are performed.”

RMA has long-standing industry tire repair standards that clearly outline the steps necessary to properly repair tires.

S 7082 and its Assembly companion, A 9683, would prohibit a motor vehicle repair shop from repairing a tire if any of the following conditions exist:

  • The tire tread depth is equal to or less than 2/32 inch on any area of the tread
  • The damage is to a tire sidewall
  • The damage extends into the tread shoulder/belt edge area
  • The damage exceeds 1/4 inch
  • The tire has an existing improper repair
  • The repair will overlap an existing, proper repair

The legislation also provides guidance to motor vehicle repair shops about how to properly repair tires:

  • Demount the tire from the rim/wheel assembly
  • Inspect the tire to determine the extent of damage on the inside of the tire
  • Clean the inner liner to remove any contaminants inside the tire
  • Remove the damaged portions of the tire
  • Buff the inner liner to create a smooth and even surface
  • Fill the injury with a cured rubber stem and properly install a tire patch or install a combination repair unit

“RMA supports these bills and urges New York legislators to enact this legislation,” Zielinski said.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S.

RMA Tire Repair Information Available for Download

 Additional Format Offers More Access to Important Safety Information

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.April 5, 2011 - – Longstanding industry guidelines for passenger and light truck tire repair are now more easily accessible to tire professionals through the Rubber Manufacturers Association’s (RMA) website.

In addition to a wall-chart of step-by-step, industry-recommended tire repair practices, RMA now offers the information in a free, downloadable format. A tire repair video news release and a consumer-friendly information sheet also are available.

“Proper tire repair is an essential consumer safety practice,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “Faulty or improper repairs may result in tires placed back into service that are at greater risk of failure.”

A 2006 RMA study of more than 14,000 scrap tires found that 17 percent of tires had a tire repair. Of that subset, 88 percent of the repairs were improper.

Among several criteria to perform a proper repair are:

  • Repairs are limited to the tread area only (No sidewall repairs!)
  • Puncture injury cannot be greater than 1/4 inch (6mm) in diameter
  • Repairs must be performed by removing the tire from the rim/wheel assembly to perform a complete inspection to assess all damage that may be present
  • Repairs cannot overlap
  • A rubber stem, or plug, must be applied to fill the puncture injury and a patch must be applied to seal the inner liner. A common repair unit is a one-piece unit with a stem and patch portion. A plug by itself is an unacceptable repair

Earlier this year, a California jury awarded a $14 million judgment against an auto dealer for improperly repairing a tire that eventually failed and contributed to a fatal van crash.

“Tire and automotive service professionals need to understand how to determine whether a tire can be repaired and then how to repair it correctly,” Cannon said.

RMA’s wall chart is available for purchase at www.rma.org, Or download a free version at this link:http://www.rma.org/tire_safety/tire_maintenance_and_safety/tire_repair. A one-page, consumer-friendly tire repair fact sheet also is available. Additionally, the page links to the Tire Industry Association’s web page (www.tireindustry.org) for information about training programs.

“Consumers need to know that to ensure their safety; a proper tire repair takes more than ten minutes and $10, “Cannon said. “If someone tells you that, you should take it somewhere else and have it done right.”

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S.

Improper Tire Repair Poses Safety Concern

Know What to Ask When A Flat Needs Fixed

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.February 28, 2008 - Knowing the difference between a proper tire repair and an improper repair could be critical to vehicle safety. A tire industry study showed that nearly 88 percent of tire repairs are performed improperly. An improper tire repair could pose a safety hazard to you and your family and could also affect a tire manufacturer’s warranty.

“Consumers need to know some essential information about tire industry recommended puncture repair procedures,” said Daniel Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “An improperly repaired tire is a safety risk you shouldn’t take.”

One key process in a proper repair is removing a tire from the wheel to inspect any damage that may occur to the inner liner of the tire.

Zielinski said, “Don’t let anyone tell you that a repair can be completed without removing the tire from the wheel. If you’re told by an automotive repair shop that a flat repair will take only five or ten minutes, you should walk out.”

RMA offers tire dealers and automotive repair outlets a detailed wall-chart for proper tire repairs. Among the criteria to perform a proper repair are:

• Repairs are limited to the tread area only;
• Puncture injury cannot be greater than ¼-inch (6mm) in diameter;
• Repairs must be performed by removing the tire from the rim/wheelassembly to perform a complete inspection to assess all damage that may be present ;
• Repairs cannot overlap;
• A rubber stem, or plug, must be applied to fill the puncture injury and a patch must be applied to seal the inner liner. A common repair unit is a one-piece unit with a stem and patch portion. A plug by itself or a patch by itself is an unacceptable repair.

“Ask your tire service technician if he uses tire industry-approved repair procedures,” Zielinski said. “Also, some tire manufacturers may have repair limits or restrictions for some tires, such as run flats and others.”

A 2006 tire industry review of more than 14,000 scrap tires showed 17 percent had been repaired and of that number, 88 percent of repairs were done incorrectly.

Improperly repaired tires can fail while in service, such as by tread-belt separation, which may result in an accident causing serious personal injury or death.

Click here to order RMA’s Proper Repair Procedure Wall Chart.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products. RMA members employ over 120,000 workers and account for more than $21 billion in annual sales.