New Era: RMA Now a Tire Manufacturer-Only Organization

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.October 21, 2010 - The Rubber Manufacturers Association has successfully completed a reorganization and is now a trade association dedicated to a singular mission, to represent the interests of tire manufacturers in the United States.

“The restructured RMA will bring an intense focus to the pressing regulatory and legislative needs of the U.S. tire manufacturing industry,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “The host of general issues that impact the elastomer products sector will be handled by a new organization, the Association for Rubber Products Manufacturers (ARPM). APRM will meet in Indianapolis this week and we wish them well,” Cannon said.

Earlier this year, RMA’s Board of Directors approved a plan to restructure the organization to better serve the interests of its membership. The restructuring resulted in two separate organizations – one that represents tire manufacturers and one to serve the needs of elastomer products manufacturers. Each organization is an independent 501(c)(6) trade association with its own board of directors, officers, budget and management.

Cannon said, “Separating the two entities will reduce costs and improve the performance of each organization. Each group will be positioned to better serve the immediate needs of its members while preserving the opportunity to work together on issues of mutual interest.”

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S.

RMA Celebrates 20 Years of Scrap Tire Leadership, Success

Industry Has Helped Reduce Stockpiles, Spur Markets, Improve Environment

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.September 30, 2010 - Twenty years ago, the U.S. was littered with more than one billion stockpiled scrap tires and only 11 percent of the annually generated scrap tires were sent to an end use market. The tire manufacturing industry was contending with a nascent scrap tire industry and a Congress that wanted results.

Rather than going from bad to worse, scrap tire management underwent a radical turnaround. Today, only 100 million stockpiled scrap tires remain and the number continues to shrink. While only one viable market for scrap tires existed in 1990, today several markets exist that consume nearly 85 percent of annually generated scrap tires. These markets have made scrap tires into a valuable commodity and have improved the environment.

A significant factor in this transformation from environmental problem to environmental success story was a tire manufacturer-led initiative. In 1990, the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA) created the Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC), an organization focused on developing end use markets for scrap tires and assisting in the abatement of stockpiled tires. Although the functions of the STMC were later absorbed by RMA, the mission, commitment and effort did not change.

“RMA and its tire manufacturer members recognized a serious environmental issue and invested significant resources, time and effort to make positive changes,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “At a time when many things could have gone terribly wrong for the industry, tire manufacturers stepped up and did the right thing at the right time. Having achieved major success over the past two decades, RMA and our members have not relented and continue to work with a broad spectrum of scrap tire industry stakeholders and regulators to ensure that these successes are not reversed,” Cannon added.

Since 1990, RMA’s scrap tire efforts have been spearheaded by Michael Blumenthal, who began as the Scrap Tire Management Council’s executive director and is now a vice president at RMA.

Blumenthal identified a key shortcoming of the scrap tire industry: a lack of information. “One of the first efforts we undertook was to collect, develop and distribute timely and pertinent information to the scrap tire industry,” Blumenthal said. “Between 1990 and 1996 reports and documents on virtually every facet of the industry were published. Information collection and distribution remains a critical practice to this day.”

Another challenge was market development. In 1990, only one viable market for scrap tires existed – tire-derived fuel (TDF). The scrap tire industry was trying to develop other markets, but the technology and market opportunities did not materialize until 1994. In the early 1990’s Congress was actively considering scrap tire legislation, and enacted a mandate to use ground rubber in federally-funded asphalt pavement projects. The result of that mandate was a disaster and taught a powerful lesson to the emerging scrap tire industry.

“The scrap tire industry was under pressure to develop non-TDF markets at a time when the industry was not prepared for such an effort,” Blumenthal said. “One of the very expensive lessons that had to be learned by government agencies was that the scrap tire industry has always been a demand-pull industry. Subsidizing the supply of processed scrap tires when the demand for it doesn’t exist causes over-supply, falling prices and failing businesses. The Congressional mandate for road construction caused more problems than it solved,” Blumenthal noted.

“Today the scrap tire industry new challenges from a wide array of sources. As scrap tire-derived products move into new markets, new questions and issues have arisen,” Blumenthal said. “The recession has hit states hard financially and many have been diverting scrap tire funds to finance other state programs. We continue to fight these diversions so that progress to date is not reversed. Additionally, we are currently fighting a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed regulation that would effectively ruin the tire derived fuel market, which still accounts for 50 percent of the market for scrap tires. This could lead to more stockpiles and greater risk of environmentally dangerous tire pile fires.”

Blumenthal added, “Our determination and resolve remain steadfast, as does our commitment to the industry and the environment. As the quote goes, it ain’t over till its over. I believe that’s a very good way to describe our approach to scrap tires management.”

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

San Antonio Drivers Need to be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure Survey

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, San Antonio drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked San Antonio second to last among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only seven percent of San Antonio vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in five vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Orlando Drivers Need to Be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure SurveyFor more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, Orlando drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked Orlando in the bottom five among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only 12 percent of Orlando vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in six vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Los Angeles Drivers Need To Be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure Survey

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, Los Angeles drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked Los Angeles in the bottom five among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only 18 percent of Los Angeles vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in six vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Dallas/Ft. Worth Drivers Need To Be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure Survey

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, Dallas/Ft. Worth drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked Dallas/Ft. Worth in the bottom five among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only five percent of Dallas/Ft. Worth vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in seven vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

House Committee Approves Measure That Threatens Manufacturers’ Proprietary Business Information

Increased Disclosure of Early Warning Information May Harm Tire Makers in U.S

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.May 28, 2010 - A House committee approved legislation this week that requires the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to make public more information that is reported to the agency by automobile, tire and automotive parts manufacturers.

The Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA) voiced a number of concerns with the Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 2010, HR 5381. The group has voiced similar concerns with a companion measure in the Senate, S 3302.

“RMA strongly supports and our members fully comply with the current early warning reporting system to provide federal safety regulators with information to help enhance motorist safety,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “However, RMA and its members are very concerned that this bill may result in NHTSA disclosing critical business information that will cause competitive harm to manufacturers in the U.S.”

A 2000 federal law mandated NHTSA’s Early Warning Reporting System. Automotive industry manufacturers are required to report substantial amounts of production and performance data and consumer claims to the agency to assist federal safety officials with identifying potential safety issues. Consumer claims regarding fatalities, injuries and property damage claims are currently made public on NHTSA’s web site.

When NHTSA created the Early Warning Reporting System, it also created categories of information that would be protected from public disclosure as confidential business information. For tire manufacturers, this included production data, warranty claims and common green tires, which are tires that have not been cured.

“NHTSA conducted a rigorous process using strict Freedom of Information Act principles to develop a federal regulation that balanced public disclose of some early warning information with the need to protect some critical business data it receives each quarter from manufacturers,” Cannon said.

The Motor Vehicle Safety Act also includes a mandate requiring a brake override system in vehicles to help prevent the possibility of sudden unintended acceleration. Additionally, the measure gives NHTSA the authority to declare that a vehicle, tire or automotive part presents an “imminent hazard” to motorist safety. Such a declaration would allow the agency to impose a range of remedies to force manufacturers to address a potential safety issue.

The bill also boosts federal penalties on manufacturers for safety-related issues to a maximum of $200 million. The House version would allow individuals to sue the agency if they disagree with an agency determination in answering a petition to investigate a possible vehicle defect.

“Permitting lawsuits to overturn NHTSA’s thorough investigation of potential safety issues would force the agency to divert critical resources to redundant tasks and legal defenses to answer likely lawsuit challenges to defect petition decisions,” Cannon said.

The House bill is expected to go to the House floor in the coming weeks. A Senate committee is expected to consider its version of the bill in early June.

“We will continue to engage with legislators and work toward a reasonable solution that enhances motorist safety while addressing the risk to RMA members’ competitive business information posed by this bill,” Cannon said.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Colorado Senate Committee Approves Scrap Tire Measure

 Bill Directs More Resources to Cleanup, Enforcement and Market Development

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.April 15, 2010 - A Colorado Senate Committee approved comprehensive legislation this week to reform the state’s scrap tire laws. More than 60 million stockpiled scrap tires are in Colorado — one of the few states where piles are growing.

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, representing tire manufacturers in the U.S., has been working to change Colorado’s scrap tire law since the last changes were made to the program several years ago. RMA testified in favor of the legislation this week.

HB 1018, which passed the House in March, was unanimously approved by the Colorado Senate Transportation Committee. The measure will next be considered by the Senate Finance Committee.

“HB 1018 is the result of eight months of negotiation among all major scrap tire stakeholders in Colorado,” said Michael Blumenthal, RMA vice president, who testified in support of HB 1018. “If enacted, Colorado will be able to address some of the gaps in their program, while focusing on market development and continued stockpile abatement.”

Colorado currently imposes a $1.50 fee on new tires that should be used for enforcement of state scrap tire regulations, cleanup of waste tire piles and market development.

“Unfortunately, Colorado has not effectively managed scrap tires,” Blumenthal said. “The state has the greatest number of tires in stockpiles in the nation and unless the system is changed, those piles will continue to grow.”

HB 1018 would:

  • Place more of the scrap tire funds directly into scrap tire activities.
  • Consolidates all waste tire programs under the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and establishes new requirements for scrap tire market development, fire planning and prevention, waste tire hauler regulations, and waste tire facility regulations.
  • Creates regulations that will benefit the state and the scrap tire industry, closes gaps in the regulation that will decrease the incidence of unlawful dumping of tires.
  • Creates an advisory committee that can provide on going review and evaluation of the program that will increase the likelihood of constant improvement to the program.

“We will continue to press Colorado lawmakers to enact this legislation,” Blumenthal said. “The measure is long overdue and urgently needed. We are grateful to the House and Senate sponsors of this legislation and will work with them to see this bill enacted.”

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Goodyear’s Rich Kramer Elected RMA Chairman of the Board

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.November 18, 2009 - The Rubber Manufacturers Association has elected Richard J. Kramer as Chairman of the Board of Directors. Kramer is Chief Operating Officer of The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company. He also serves as President of the company’s North American Tire business unit, a position he has held since March 2007.
Kramer succeeds Jim MacMaster, Executive Vice President, Business Division for Yokohama Tire Corporation.

“Jim MacMaster provided valuable time, energy and leadership during the past two years,” said Charles A. Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “We look forward to continued strong leadership with Rich Kramer.”
The RMA Chairman of the Board of Directors is elected to a two-year term. Kramer has served on the RMA board since 2007 and also has chaired RMA’s Finance Committee.

“A strong, effective trade association is crucial to ensuring that industry concerns and issues are heard by federal and state policymakers. I am looking forward to my term as RMA Chairman and working with my industry colleagues to address the public policy and regulatory issues and challenges before us.” Kramer said.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include more than 100 companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products. RMA members employ over 120,000 workers and account for more than $21 billion in annual sales.

2010 National Tire Safety Week Announced

 Tire Industry Urges Consumers to Maintain Tires to Save Fuel, Promote Safety

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.November 6, 2009 - The Rubber Manufacturers Association today announced the ninth Annual National Tire Safety Week will be held June 6-12, 2010.

The annual event is an initiative of the RMA’s “Be Tire Smart – Play Your PART” program, a year-round effort designed to help drivers learn the simple steps they can take to ensure that their tires are in good working condition. RMA is the national trade association for tire manufacturers.

Tire manufacturers and retailers nationwide will work to educate motorists about proper tire care and maintenance. RMA provides tire retailers, auto dealers and automotive repair shops with free “Be Tire Smart” brochures and other materials. Many participating retail outlets use the opportunity to promote tire care through advertising, promotions, free tire pressure checks and conducting media outreach.

More than 21,000 tire dealers, auto dealers and automotive repair shops participated during the 2009 National Tire Safety Week. RMA released a survey of more than 5,400 vehicles that showed half with at least one under inflated tire. Nearly 20 percent of vehicles had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi). Under inflated tires waste fuel, risk safety and cause tires to wear out faster.

Partners in the Be Tire Smart program include tire retailers, auto dealers, safety advocates and state government agencies. Among the list of Be Tire Smart partners are: AAA, American Car Care Centers (ACCC), Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), Big 10 Tires, Belle Tire, Big O Tires, Costco, Discount Tire Co., Dunn Tire, Expert Tire, Firestone Complete Auto Care, GCR Tire Centers, Goodyear Auto Centers, Hyundai Motor America, Just Tires, Kaufman Tire, Les Schwab, Merchant’s Tire, Motorist Assurance Program, Recreational Vehicle Safety & Education Foundation, National Tire and Battery (NTB), National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA), Northwest Tire, Peerless Tires, Pep Boys, Sears Automotive Centers, STS Tire and Auto Centers, Sullivan Tire and Auto Service, Tire Factory, Tire Industry Association (TIA), Tire Kingdom, Tire One, Tires Plus, Tire Warehouse, Town Fair Tires, VIP Parts, Tires and Service, Wal-Mart Tire and Lube Express and many others.

Tire and auto retailers who are interested in obtaining free RMA materials for National Tire Safety Week can order them online at www.betiresmart.org. Those who have participated in the event before can expect to receive materials again this year.

The Be Tire Smart program is funded by RMA’s tire manufacturer members: Bridgestone Americas, Inc., Continental Tire North America, Inc., Cooper Tire & Rubber Company, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, Michelin North America, Inc., Pirelli North America, Inc., Toyo Tire Holdings of Americas, Inc., and Yokohama Tire Corporation.

For more information on the Be Tire Smart Program and National Tire Safety Week visit www.betiresmart.org.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.