Millions of Motorists Need to “Get a Grip”

Survey Shows 28 Million Vehicles with At Least One Bald Tire!

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.November 19, 2010 - Millions of drivers are putting themselves at increased risk by driving with one or more bald tires. A tire industry survey showed that nearly 11 percent of vehicles had at least one bald tire, which can increase the risk of a crash particularly in wet weather conditions.

According to AAA, 94 percent of Thanksgiving travelers this year will drive to their destination. Of the estimated 254 million motorists who hit the road nearly 28 million could be at risk by driving on bald tires.

The 6,300 vehicle survey was sponsored by the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA), the national trade association of tire manufacturers in the U.S. RMA is urging motorists to regularly check tire tread depth and replace worn out tires before they become a safety risk.

According to RMA checking tread depth is simple and only costs a penny. To do the “penny test,” take a penny; insert Abe Lincoln’s head upside down into the tread. If you can see all of his head, your tire is 2/32nds of an inch deep or less and should be replaced.

Tires also have “wear bars” built into them. These are indicators that appear when you have worn your tread down to the limit. These indicators are raised sections spaced intermittently in the bottom of the tread grooves. When they appear “even” with the outside of the tread, it’s time for tire replacement.

Other RMA research shows that 64 percent of motorists do not know how to tell if tires are bald and 9 percent never check their tires’ tread depth.

“Your tires are a critical vehicle safety component,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “Worn out tires cannot grip the road properly, increase stopping distances and can contribute to skidding or loss of vehicle control.”

Under wet weather conditions, bald tires can hydroplane, which occurs when the tire is riding on a film of water. This can lead to a loss of vehicle control and increase the risk of a crash.

Not only are too many motorists not paying attention to tread depth, they also are ignoring tire inflation pressure. Under inflated tires also pose a safety risk, wear out faster and increase vehicle fuel consumption.

A survey released by RMA earlier this year of more than 6,300 vehicles’ tire pressure conducted in March-May 2010 found:
• Only 17% of vehicles had four properly inflated tires.
• 55% of vehicles had at least one under inflated tire.
• 15% of vehicles had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi.)

Tire inflation pressure should be checked every month and before long trips. To properly check tire pressure, motorists should check once each month; check tires when cold – before the vehicle is driven and; use the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended pressure found on a label located on the driver’s door or door post or check the owner’s manual.

While basic tire maintenance only takes a few minutes each month, many tire retailers nationwide offer tire pressure and tread depth check at no charge.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S.

10th National Tire Safety Week Announced

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.November 12, 2010 - The Rubber Manufacturers Association today announced the tenth Annual National Tire Safety Week will be held June 5-11, 2011.

National Tire Safety Week is an initiative of the RMA’s “Be Tire Smart – Play Your PART” program, a year-round effort designed to help drivers learn the simple steps they can take to ensure that their tires are in good working condition. RMA is the national trade association for tire manufacturers.

Tire manufacturers and retailers nationwide will work to educate motorists about proper tire care and maintenance. RMA provides tire retailers, auto dealers and automotive repair shops with free “Be Tire Smart” brochures and other materials. Many participating retail outlets use the opportunity to promote tire care through advertising, promotions, free tire pressure checks and conducting media outreach.

More than 21,000 tire dealers, auto dealers and automotive repair shops participated during the 2010 National Tire Safety Week. RMA released a survey of more than 6,300 vehicles that showed 55% of vehicles had at least one under inflated tire. Fifteen percent of vehicles had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi). Under inflated tires waste fuel, risk safety and cause tires to wear out faster. The study also showed that 10% of vehicles had at least one bald tire.

Partners in the Be Tire Smart program include tire retailers, auto dealers, safety advocates and state government agencies. Among the list of Be Tire Smart partners are: AAA, Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), Big 10 Tires, Belle Tire, Big O Tires, Costco, Discount Tire Co., Dunn Tire, Expert Tire, Firestone Complete Auto Care, GCR Tire Centers, Goodyear Auto Centers, Hyundai Motor America, Just Tires, Kaufman Tire, Les Schwab, Merchant’s Tire, Midas, National Tire and Battery (NTB), National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA), Northwest Tire Factory, Peerless Tires, Pep Boys, Sears Automotive Centers, STS Tire and Auto Centers, Sullivan Tire and Auto Service, Tire Industry Association (TIA), Tire Kingdom, Tire One, Tires Plus, Tire Pros, Town Fair Tires, VIP Parts, Tires and Service, Wal-Mart Tire and Lube Express and many others.

Tire and auto retailers who are interested in obtaining free RMA materials for National Tire Safety Week can order them online at www.betiresmart.org. Those who have participated in the event before can expect to receive materials again this year.

The Be Tire Smart program is funded by RMA’s tire manufacturer members: Bridgestone Americas, Inc., Continental Tire the Americas, LLC, Cooper Tire & Rubber Company, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, Michelin North America, Inc., Pirelli Tire North America, Toyo Tire Holdings of Americas, Inc., and Yokohama Tire Corporation.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S.

New Era: RMA Now a Tire Manufacturer-Only Organization

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.October 21, 2010 - The Rubber Manufacturers Association has successfully completed a reorganization and is now a trade association dedicated to a singular mission, to represent the interests of tire manufacturers in the United States.

“The restructured RMA will bring an intense focus to the pressing regulatory and legislative needs of the U.S. tire manufacturing industry,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “The host of general issues that impact the elastomer products sector will be handled by a new organization, the Association for Rubber Products Manufacturers (ARPM). APRM will meet in Indianapolis this week and we wish them well,” Cannon said.

Earlier this year, RMA’s Board of Directors approved a plan to restructure the organization to better serve the interests of its membership. The restructuring resulted in two separate organizations – one that represents tire manufacturers and one to serve the needs of elastomer products manufacturers. Each organization is an independent 501(c)(6) trade association with its own board of directors, officers, budget and management.

Cannon said, “Separating the two entities will reduce costs and improve the performance of each organization. Each group will be positioned to better serve the immediate needs of its members while preserving the opportunity to work together on issues of mutual interest.”

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S.

RMA Celebrates 20 Years of Scrap Tire Leadership, Success

Industry Has Helped Reduce Stockpiles, Spur Markets, Improve Environment

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.September 30, 2010 - Twenty years ago, the U.S. was littered with more than one billion stockpiled scrap tires and only 11 percent of the annually generated scrap tires were sent to an end use market. The tire manufacturing industry was contending with a nascent scrap tire industry and a Congress that wanted results.

Rather than going from bad to worse, scrap tire management underwent a radical turnaround. Today, only 100 million stockpiled scrap tires remain and the number continues to shrink. While only one viable market for scrap tires existed in 1990, today several markets exist that consume nearly 85 percent of annually generated scrap tires. These markets have made scrap tires into a valuable commodity and have improved the environment.

A significant factor in this transformation from environmental problem to environmental success story was a tire manufacturer-led initiative. In 1990, the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA) created the Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC), an organization focused on developing end use markets for scrap tires and assisting in the abatement of stockpiled tires. Although the functions of the STMC were later absorbed by RMA, the mission, commitment and effort did not change.

“RMA and its tire manufacturer members recognized a serious environmental issue and invested significant resources, time and effort to make positive changes,” said Charles Cannon, RMA president and CEO. “At a time when many things could have gone terribly wrong for the industry, tire manufacturers stepped up and did the right thing at the right time. Having achieved major success over the past two decades, RMA and our members have not relented and continue to work with a broad spectrum of scrap tire industry stakeholders and regulators to ensure that these successes are not reversed,” Cannon added.

Since 1990, RMA’s scrap tire efforts have been spearheaded by Michael Blumenthal, who began as the Scrap Tire Management Council’s executive director and is now a vice president at RMA.

Blumenthal identified a key shortcoming of the scrap tire industry: a lack of information. “One of the first efforts we undertook was to collect, develop and distribute timely and pertinent information to the scrap tire industry,” Blumenthal said. “Between 1990 and 1996 reports and documents on virtually every facet of the industry were published. Information collection and distribution remains a critical practice to this day.”

Another challenge was market development. In 1990, only one viable market for scrap tires existed – tire-derived fuel (TDF). The scrap tire industry was trying to develop other markets, but the technology and market opportunities did not materialize until 1994. In the early 1990’s Congress was actively considering scrap tire legislation, and enacted a mandate to use ground rubber in federally-funded asphalt pavement projects. The result of that mandate was a disaster and taught a powerful lesson to the emerging scrap tire industry.

“The scrap tire industry was under pressure to develop non-TDF markets at a time when the industry was not prepared for such an effort,” Blumenthal said. “One of the very expensive lessons that had to be learned by government agencies was that the scrap tire industry has always been a demand-pull industry. Subsidizing the supply of processed scrap tires when the demand for it doesn’t exist causes over-supply, falling prices and failing businesses. The Congressional mandate for road construction caused more problems than it solved,” Blumenthal noted.

“Today the scrap tire industry new challenges from a wide array of sources. As scrap tire-derived products move into new markets, new questions and issues have arisen,” Blumenthal said. “The recession has hit states hard financially and many have been diverting scrap tire funds to finance other state programs. We continue to fight these diversions so that progress to date is not reversed. Additionally, we are currently fighting a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed regulation that would effectively ruin the tire derived fuel market, which still accounts for 50 percent of the market for scrap tires. This could lead to more stockpiles and greater risk of environmentally dangerous tire pile fires.”

Blumenthal added, “Our determination and resolve remain steadfast, as does our commitment to the industry and the environment. As the quote goes, it ain’t over till its over. I believe that’s a very good way to describe our approach to scrap tires management.”

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

2010 Tire Shipments to Increase Eight Percent

Increases to Passenger Tire Shipments Cited

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.August 9, 2010 - Tire shipments in 2010 are projected to increase by approximately eight percent primarily due to a 38 percent increase in Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) passenger tires and a five percent increase in passenger replacement tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association.

Total 2010 tire shipments are projected to increase to 282 million units from last year’s 260 million. The rebound in 2010 shipments would be roughly equal to 2008’s shipment level.

The increase in tire shipments reflects an economy reemerging from the severe economic downturn coupled with the recent turnaround of the domestic automotive manufacturers and a return to established driving habits. However, high unemployment, low consumer confidence and continued depressed home values continue to weigh on the consumer.

RMA’s Tire Market Analysis Committee forecast for key categories and their respective segments for 2010 include:

  • Original Equipment Passenger Tires:

Large increases in domestic vehicle production as a result of the resumption of auto manufacturer production driven by OEM incentive and financing programs will lead to a nearly 38 percent increase in 2010 shipments to approximately 34 million units. With the economy predicted to stabilize and slowly emerge from the recession in 2010, a rebound in vehicle sales and subsequent vehicle production is anticipated. This will further increase OE tire shipments in 2011 by nearly three million units to the 37 million unit level.

  • Original Equipment Light Truck (LT) Tires:

This category will experience an approximate 13 percent increase, or 400,000 units, in 2010 to nearly 3.2 million units due to stabilizing economic conditions and the subsequent impact on the commercial sectors which utilize light truck vehicles. Despite a continual consumer demand preference for vehicle fitments with p-metric passenger tires in place of LT tires, a nearly 100,000 unit gain is anticipated in OE LT as the economy continues to recover in 2011.

  • Original Equipment Medium/Wide-Base/Heavy On-Highway Commercial Truck Tires:

Given the severe economic conditions in the commercial sector in 2009 depressing OEM truck sales, a nearly 16 percent increase is forecast for 2010 to approximately 2.8 million units. The continued economic rebound and pent up demand for vehicles is projected to result in a net gain of approximately 800,000 units increase in shipments in 2011.

  • Replacement Passenger Tire:

Due to faster recovery in the auto sector from the protracted and deeper economic downturn in 2009, the market will realize a better than expected five percent increase in 2010, or approximately 10 million units, reaching a level of 199 million units. Growth is anticipated to continue in 2011 with the replacement sector estimated to increase by a modest twote million units.

  • Replacement Light Truck Tire:

This segment represents a core group of consumers and the small commercial vehicle market – mainly “class 3” trucks. As such, the extension of the first-time homebuyer’s tax credit provided a temporary boost to the housing/construction industry allowing for a nearly three percent increase in the forecast for replacement LT tire shipments for 2010 reaching the 28 million unit level. No further changes to this level is anticipated in 2011 primarily in line with future changes to the housing industry

  • Replacement Medium/Wide-Base/Heavy On-Highway Commercial Truck Tires:

The market will realize an increase of approximately 15 percent, or nearly two million units in 2010 to approximately 15 million units total as a result of the better than expected recovery in the commercial sector. However, given the uneven economic rebound forecast going forward, this market is expected to increase by approximately 600,000 units in 2011.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

RMA’s Tire Market Analysis Committee is comprised of tire market professionals representing the major U.S. tire manufacturers, which account for more than 90 percent of all U.S. tire shipments. Their analyses and forecasts of current and future industry activity include a review of RMA tire industry and economic data, government trade figures, and vehicle sales and production. TMAC develops its consensus view for tire demand from this process. The views expressed in this release are not the sole opinion of any one committee member, member company, or RMA representative.

EPA Proposal is Anti-Environment, Anti-Business and Anti-Common Sense

Action Will Increase Stockpiled Scrap Tires, Risk to Public Health and Safety

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.August 5, 2010 - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a rule that would significantly harm the existing infrastructure that manages scrap tires as well as reverse two decades of environmental cleanup success, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA).

After decades of EPA-sanctioned use as a supplemental industrial fuel, EPA is proposing now to declare whole scrap tires a solid waste. The new designation would require facilities using whole tire-derived fuel (TDF) to add costly new emission controls that would not be required to burn traditional, less efficient fuels. Instead of this option, many TDF users, likely will opt to stop using TDF in favor of more costly, less efficient and higher emitting traditional fossil fuels, including coal. This will likely result in a dramatic reduction of TDF use while driving tens of millions of scrap tires back to landfills, stockpiles and illegal dumping sites.

At the same time, EPA will still allow the use of processed scrap tires to be used as fuel only if most of the steel content is removed, which would add costs to TDF use for facilities such as cement kilns, and increase the amount of energy needed and air pollutants emitted to supply TDF to these facilities. Steel content in tires does not affect overall emissions when consumed as TDF. Instead, the steel is used as a raw material in the manufacture of cement.

“EPA’s proposed regulatory scheme would devastate the tire-derived fuel market in the U.S. which will ripple across the entire scrap tire market infrastructure,” said Tracey Norberg, RMA senior vice president. “Worse, the proposal will drive scrap tires back to stockpiles and illegal tire dumps after two decades of success in cleaning up stockpiles and promoting safe, viable, effective markets for scrap tires.”

Scrap tire management is an environmental success story in the U.S. In 1990, more than one billion tires were stockpiled across the country while only 11 percent of annually generated scrap tires were reused. Today, fewer than 100 million tires remain stockpiled and nearly 90 percent of annually generated scrap tires are reused. Each year, about 300 million scrap tires are generated in the U.S. Of those, about 52 percent are used as TDF in the cement industry, pulp and paper mills and by some utility and industrial boilers.

In comments filed today, RMA said that EPA does not have the legal authority to declare TDF as a “solid waste” instead of a fuel. TDF has a long history as a fuel, which is recognized by EPA. The agency’s own data indicates that the combustion of TDF, whether whole or minimally processed without removal of metal beads, not only provides better fuel value than coal (12,000 – 16,000 Btu/lb) but also results in comparable or even lower emissions than coal combustion.

“EPA’s proposal turns common sense on its head and would harm the environment while causing potentially thousands of jobs to be lost in the scrap tire industry,” Norberg said.

More tire stockpiles increases the risk of fire and mosquito infestation. Unlike the controlled, extreme heat combustion when TDF is used as a fuel, a burning pile of scrap tires can cause considerable environmental harm. Such fires can burn for days or weeks. Stockpiled tires also collect rainwater which then becomes an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes that carry diseases.

RMA advocated that EPA should consider TDF an historical fuel, regardless of whether the scrap tires have been discarded, which would allow states to continue to regulate those scrap tires not used as TDF under state waste management regulations. Alternatively, RMA indicated it supported an approach initially outlined by EPA in January 2009 that would have allowed annually generated scrap tires to be continue to be used as a fuel but stockpiled scrap tires would be considered “discarded” and therefore be a solid waste subject to new emission controls if combusted.

“EPA should reconsider this deeply flawed, anti-environment, anti-business and anti-common sense proposal,” Norberg said.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

San Antonio Drivers Need to be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure Survey

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, San Antonio drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked San Antonio second to last among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only seven percent of San Antonio vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in five vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Orlando Drivers Need to Be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure SurveyFor more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, Orlando drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked Orlando in the bottom five among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only 12 percent of Orlando vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in six vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Los Angeles Drivers Need To Be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure Survey

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, Los Angeles drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked Los Angeles in the bottom five among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only 18 percent of Los Angeles vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in six vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.

Dallas/Ft. Worth Drivers Need To Be Tire Smart

City Fares Poorly in Tire Pressure Survey

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.June 30, 2010 - Before hitting the road for the July 4th holiday, Dallas/Ft. Worth drivers need to pay more attention to their tires, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association. The tire manufacturer trade group conducted a vehicle tire pressure survey that ranked Dallas/Ft. Worth in the bottom five among more than 30 U.S. cities.

Only five percent of Dallas/Ft. Worth vehicles had four properly inflated tires and two out of every three had at least one under inflated tire. About one in seven vehicles had a tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch – a significant loss of tire pressure.

Nationally, under inflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries annually according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, low tire pressure can cost motorists up to 9 cents a gallon at the gas pump. Under inflated tires cause a vehicle to work harder and burn more gas.

The RMA survey of more than 6,300 vehicles in 33 cities this year also found only 17 percent of vehicles had four properly inflated tires. More than 15 percent, representing 38 million vehicles on U.S. roads, had at least one tire under inflated by 8 pounds per square inch (psi).

The cities that performed worst in the RMA tire pressure survey — in descending order — were Dallas/Ft.Worth, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Antonio and Birmingham. These cities had low percentages of vehicles with four properly inflated tires and larger percentages of under inflated tires.

“Under inflated tires are dangerous, waste fuel and money and cause tires to wear out faster,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA senior vice president, public affairs. “Motorists can help reduce the safety risk and stop wasting gas and money by taking five minutes to check tire pressure every month.”

The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, has some simple tips to check tire pressure properly:

  • Check tire pressure every month and before long trips – and don’t forget the spare!
  • Remember to check tires before driving – when tires are cold – to get an accurate reading.
  • Use the correct tire inflation pressure, which can be found on a label on the driver’s door or check the owner’s manual. Don’t look at the tire sidewall, which has the maximum pressure for the tire.

# # # #

The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products.