RMA Promotes Five

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.October 16, 2007 - The Rubber Manufacturers Association today announced promotions for five staff persons.

Tracey Norberg is promoted to senior vice president, environment and resource recovery and deputy general counsel. Ms. Norberg has been at RMA since 1997. Her responsibilities include management and oversight of the organization’s policy efforts on tire rolling resistance, scrap tire management and other environmental issues.

Daniel Zielinski is promoted to senior vice president, public affairs. Mr. Zielinski started at RMA in 2000. He serves as RMA’s federal legislative lobbyist, supervises the association’s government affairs and media relations efforts and oversees RMA’s Be Tire Smart – Play Your PART tire care education program.

Michael Blumenthal is promoted to vice president, environment and resource recovery. He has been at RMA since 1990 and manages RMA’s efforts on scrap tire issues. In particular, Mr. Blumenthal is active in market development efforts, initiates and implements educational conferences for industry and government participants and provides technical expertise for legislative and regulatory issues and programs.

Christian Gullott is promoted to vice president, state government affairs. Mr. Gullott joined RMA in 2005 and is responsible for RMA’s state executive branch and legislative advocacy efforts.

Daniel Mustico is promoted to vice president, Elastomer Products Group (EPG). Mr. Mustico has been at RMA since 1989. Mr. Mustico is responsible for the membership and programs of EPG, which represents manufacturers of elastomeric engineered products (non-tire) and their suppliers.

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products. RMA members employ over 120,000 workers and account for more than $21 billion in annual sales.

“Fall” Back Into a Tire Maintenance Routine

Don’t Let New Vehicle Technology Replace Your Old-Fashioned Tire Gauge

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C.October 2, 2007 - If you are buying a new car this fall, newly mandated devices will help monitor your vehicle’s tire pressure. However, a tire industry group cautions that new tire pressure monitoring systems are not a replacement for an old-fashioned tire gauge.

Federal law requires every new 2008 model year vehicle to come equipped with a tire pressure monitoring system that will warn a driver when tire pressure drops 25 percent. The Rubber Manufacturers Association, which represents tire manufacturers, says that is no reason to throw away your tire gauge.

“Motorists risk tire damage if they wait to check tires until they see a dashboard warning light after a 25 percent loss of tire pressure,” said Dan Zielinski, RMA vice president, communications. “For many vehicles, a pressure loss of less than 25 percent increases risk. That’s why motorists must check tire pressure every month with a tire gauge.”

A 2007 RMA survey indicates that tire pressure monitoring systems may cause drivers to become more complacent about tire care. Two-thirds of drivers reported that they would be “less concerned with routinely maintaining” tire pressure if their vehicle had a monitoring system.

Additionally, when asked how often they would check tire pressure if their vehicle were equipped with a tire pressure monitoring system, an alarming 40 percent of drivers said that they would either “never” manually check tire pressure or check it “only when the warning light comes on.”

“Tire pressure monitoring systems can be effective at detecting an unexpected loss of tire pressure,” Zielinski said. “But it is no substitute for regular tire maintenance with a tire gauge.” Tires can lose 1-2 pounds-per-square inch (PSI) of pressure each month.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) statistics show that about one in every three cars has a significantly under inflated tire and that 660 fatalities and 33,000 injuries occur every year as a result of low tire pressure-related crashes. According to RMA, 85 percent of drivers do not know how to properly check their tire pressure.

“With Fall here, checking tire pressure is important because tire pressure drops 1-2 PSI for every 10 degree drop in temperature,” Zielinski said. “Keeping tires properly inflated promotes safety, maximizes fuel economy and helps tires last.”

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The Rubber Manufacturers Association is the national trade association for the rubber products industry. Its members include companies that manufacture various rubber products, including tires, hoses, belts, seals, molded goods, and other finished rubber products. RMA members employ over 120,000 workers and account for more than $21 billion in annual sales.